RICHARD L. W. CLARKE


 

 

 

LITS2002 POETRY II

2012-2013

MODULE TWO: FROM EARLY TO LATE ROMANTICISM
 

WEEK SEVEN: THE POETRY OF SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE (1772-1834)
(October 15)
 

REQUIRED READINGS:

 

 

SEMINAR 1: Notes:
  • 07
SEMINAR 2: Notes:

RECOMMENDED READINGS:

  • Bach, Bert C. The Liberating Form: a Handbook-Anthology of English and American Poetry:
  • Watson, J. R.  "Coleridge."  English Poetry of the Romantic Period, 1789-1830.  London: Longman, 1985.  212-250.

PHILWEB RESOURCES:

COMMENTS:
  • Bring a copy of the poems above to class.

WEEK EIGHT: COLERIDGE'S POETRY AND LITERARY THEORY
(October 22)
 

REQUIRED READINGS:

 

 

SEMINAR 1:
Read on your own: "This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison" (1800)
Notes:
SEMINAR 2: Notes:

RECOMMENDED READINGS:

  •  

PHILWEB RESOURCES:

COMMENTS:
 
  • Bring a copy of the poems above to class.
  • Please note that I have replaced Handout 08A with an improved account of Coleridge's distinction between 'allegory' and 'symbol.'

WEEK NINE: THE POETRY OF PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (1792-1822)
(October 29)
 

REQUIRED READINGS:

 

SEMINAR 1: Notes:
  • 09
SEMINAR 2: Notes:

RECOMMENDED READINGS:

PHILWEB RESOURCES:

COMMENTS:
  • Bring a copy of the poems above to class.
  • Before you come to the class on Shelley's "Mont Blanc," click on this link (here) which will take you to a Powerpoint presentation that includes pictures of the Alps, not least Mont Blanc, of which Shelley (like Wordsworth) writes.  Seeing the actual mountains of which they wrote can make a real difference to your appreciation of their poems.  To access the presentation, you will need Microsoft Powerpoint (which is installed on most computers) or a similar presentation programme (many of which are availabe as freeware on the net).

WEEK TEN: SHELLEY'S POETRY AND LITERARY THEORY
(November 5)
 

REQUIRED READINGS:

 

SEMINAR 1: Notes:
SEMINAR 2: Notes:

RECOMMENDED READINGS:

  • Abrams, M. H.  "Varieties of Romantic Theory: Shelley, Hazlitt, Keble, and Others."  The Mirror and the Lamp: Romantic Theory and the Critical Tradition.  Oxford: OUP, 1957.  125-155.

    • Read: "Shelley and Romantic Platonism."  126-132.

  • Wimsatt, William, and Cleanth Brooks.  "Peacock vs. Shelley: Rhapsodic Didacticism."  Literary Criticism: a Short History.  New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1957.  412-431.

PHILWEB RESOURCES:

COMMENTS:
  • Bring my summary (10) of Shelley's "Defence of Poetry" to class this week.

WEEK ELEVEN: THE POETRY OF JOHN KEATS (1795-1821)
(November 12)
 

REQUIRED READINGS:

 

 

SEMINAR 1: Notes:
SEMINAR 2: Notes:

RECOMMENDED READINGS:

PHILWEB RESOURCES:

COMMENTS:
  • Bring a copy of the poems above to class.
  • Read Handout 11 above carefully.  The questions listed there can be applied to any poem.

WEEK TWELVE: KEATS CONTINUED
(November 19)
 

REQUIRED READINGS:

 

SEMINAR 1:
Notes:
SEMINAR 2:
  • Keats, Letters (1817-1818) (pp. 493-494 in Adams)
Notes:

RECOMMENDED READINGS:

  • Abrams, M. H.  "Varieties of Romantic Theory: Shelley, Hazlitt, Keble, and Others."  The Mirror and the Lamp: Romantic Theory and the Critical Tradition.  Oxford: OUP, 1957.  125-155.

    • Read: "Longinus, Hazlitt, Keats and the Criterion of Intensity."  132-138.

PHILWEB RESOURCES:

COMMENTS:
  • Bring my summary (12) of Keats' literary theory to the second lecture.
  • One last question which I forgot to emphasise in the last lectures: what makes these five poems by Keats 'odes' per se?  To answer these question, please study the chapter on the ode in Bach's The Liberating Form (see the link to the PDF above).

You should be preparing at this point for the exam

END OF MODULE TWO
 

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