RICHARD L. W. CLARKE


 

 

 

LITS3001 MODERN POETRY
(FORMERLY E30A MODERN POETRY)
 

COURSE ARCHIVE

2007-2008

2006-2007

2005-2006

2004-2005

2003-2004
(Sherry Asgill)

2002-2003

2001-2002

2000-2001

Summer 2000
(Sam Soyer)

1999-2000

1998-1999

1997-1998
(Jane Bryce)

1996-1997

1994-1995
(Mark McWatt)

1993-1994
(Mark McWatt)

Past Exam Papers

Annual Class Photos

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THUMBNAIL DESCRIPTION

 

DETAILLED DESCRIPTION

LITS3001 Modern Poetry (formerly E30A) forms part of a sequence of inter-related poetry courses that seeks to introduce students to the historical development of poetry in English.  For information on this sequence, please click here.

This course offers a broad survey of modern poetry written from the 1890's to around the end of the Second World War, the characteristic preoccupations and techniques of which have had a profound impact on all poetry written subsequently in this century.  Some of the following poets are studied: Frost, Yeats, Pound, Eliot, William Carlos Williams, H[ilda]. D[oolittle]., Marianne Moore, Auden, Dylan Thomas, Langston Hughes, and Countee Cullen.  We shall explore the main themes (urban life, nihilism, futility, despair, etc.) and innovative technical features (e.g. Eliot’s impersonal theory of poetry [the ‘objective correlative’], colloquialism, vers libre, the deconstruction of traditional generic boundaries, etc.) which made much modern poetry such a radical departure from the Romantic and Victorian modes of poetic discourse which preceded it.

We will strive to situate this poetry in relation to the tumultuous socio-political changes (industrialism, imperialism, World War I and its aftermath, the dominance of political Liberalism, the rise of Communism and Fascism, ,the emergence of the women’s movement), the main Anglophone philosophical currents (e.g. the dominance of Idealism, the emergence of Analytic philosophy, the consolidation of nihilism), and theoretical tendencies (fin de siècle symbolism, aestheticism, decadence, and impressionism; 'High' Modernism, Myth criticism, etc.) of the time.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

 

PREREQUISITES

LITS2001 Poetry I: Wyatt to Pope (formerly E20A); and / or

LITS2002 Poetry II: the Nineteenth Century (formerly E20B). 

LITS2005 Introduction to Chaucer and LITS2013 Introduction to Milton may also be acceptable.

ASSESSMENT

Seminar participation and / or presentation(s) and / or response(s): 10%

Term paper: 30%

Final examination: 60% (2 questions in 2 hours)

Please note that, whatever the final mark, students must pass at least one question in the final exam to pass any course in Literatures in English.  Failures of this sort are denoted by FE ('Failed Exam') on the grade slip.

This site was last updated: February 03, 2011

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