RICHARD L. W. CLARKE


 

 

 

LITS2002 POETRY II: ROMANTICS AND VICTORIANS
(FORMERLY E20B)
 

COURSE ARCHIVE

2012-2013

2009-2010

2008-2009

2007-2008

2006-2007

2005-2006

2004-2005

2003-2004

2002-2003

2001-2002

2000-2001

1999-2000

1998-1999

1997-1998

1996-1997

Past Exam Papers

Annual Class Photos

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THUMBNAIL DESCRIPTION

A survey of canonical poetry written during the Romantic and Victorian periods, focusing on some of the following poets: Blake, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats, Elizabeth Browning, Robert Browning, Arnold, Christina Rosetti, and Hopkins.

DETAILLED DESCRIPTION

In this course, students will be introduced to canonical poetry produced during two significant phases in the history of Anglophone literature: the so-called Romantic (1785-1830) and Victorian (1830-90) periods.  Some of the following poets will be studied: Blake, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Tennyson, Robert Browning, Arnold, Christina Rosetti, Hardy, Hopkins, and Dunbar. 

By paying close attention to both its technical characteristics and themes, that is, form and content, students will be encouraged to undertake close textual analyses of the poetry in question and to become familiar with the characteristics of the various poetic genres encountered (e.g. the ode).

We shall also strive to situate this poetry in relation to its socio-historical contexts (e.g. the French Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, the rise of Darwinism, European imperialism and colonialism, etc.), the philosophical frameworks (e.g. German Idealism, nineteenth century materialism and existentialism, the rise of scientific positivism, etc.), and the dominant theoretical perspectives (e.g. Romantic notions of self-expression) of the time. 

We shall also take into account a wide range of criticism written on the Romantics and their heirs in order to explore changes in the ways in which nineteenth century poetry has been interpreted over the years.

PREREQUISITES

A pass in LITS1001 Introduction to Poetry. 

A pass in LITS2001 Poetry I: Wyatt to Pope would be welcome but is not mandatory.

Passes in LITS2005 Introduction to Chaucer and / or LITS2013 Milton  are also useful preparation.

ASSESSMENT

Seminar participation and / or presentation(s) and / or response(s): 10%

Term paper: 30%

Final examination: 60% (2 questions in 2 hours)

Please note that, whatever the final mark, students must pass at least one question in the final exam to pass any course in Literatures in English.  Failures of this sort are denoted by FE ('Failed Exam') on the grade slip.

This site was last updated: September 02, 2012

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